FG News

The Harm of Chemical Fertilizers

16 Dec 17

Would you like it if we ingested your body with chemicals every now and then? So why do the same to plants. Using chemical fertilizers as nutrient source to boost the plant growth is not a healthy way to treat the soil and the plants. We are seeing a massive use of chemical fertilizers in the third world countries to cater to the extra food requirement.

This over use of chemical fertilizers is leading to a number of environmental issues and health problems among the humans. This also causes a permanent damage to the soil in the area where it is used and leaves it unfit to grow crops after a point of time.

The need of the hour is to shift the system from chemical to organic to not just maintain and improve the soil quality but also reduce the harm that it is causing to us.

By: Srishti Anand

Content: https://permaculturenews.org/2016/02/25/green-leaf-manure-a-useful-organic-manure/


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Diu Becomes First UT To Run 100% On Solar Power

20 Apr 18

The harnessing of solar energy has made Diu the country’s first energy surplus Union Territory and a model for an effective way for people to harness this renewable energy source. In just three years, Diu has made rapid progress in solar power generation. The Union territory has an area of just 42 square kilometres. Despite scarcity of land, solar power plants have been installed over more than 50 acres.

Diu generates a total of 13 megawatts of electricity from solar power generating facilities daily. Around 3 MW is generated by rooftop solar plants and 10 MW by its other solar power plants. Diu’s peak-time demand for electricity goes up to 7 MW and we generate about 10.5 MW of electricity from solar energy daily. This is way more than the consumption demand requirement,” Daman and Diu Electricity Department executive engineer Milind Ingle told a national daily.The solar power has also reduced the monthly electricity bills. Previously, the 0-50 units charge was Re 1.20 per unit and 50-100 units was Re 1.50 per unit, now the charges for1-100 units is Re 1.01 per unit. In places like Delhi, Chandigarh and other parts of Punjab, Rajasthan, Haryana power tariff charges are not less than Rs 4 per unit.

 

By: Swati Kaushal

Content: https://economictimes.indiatimes.com/industry/energy/power/indias-first-solar-powered-island-diu-is-setting-an-example-of-the-rest-of-the-country/articleshow/63660012.cms


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The Black River Of Hazendal

19 Apr 18

 Think about Cape Town it floods ones vision with the beauty of the Table Mountain, the Penguin strutting white beaches and the rolling wine lands of Hazendal on the outskirts of the city. The mountains of Cape Peninsula are made of hard stone that are found nowhere else on earth and the weather blown jagged cliffs seem to glide into the sapphire blue waters of the Atlantic in the west of the city whilst warm jade colored waters lap the sides of the eastern shore. It has been listed as one of the 20 most beautiful cities of the world.

Just at the outskirts of Cape Town lies Hazendal, at a distance of 8 kilometers. The Black River a tributary of the Salt River rises in Arderne Gardens and flows underground initially beneath the Main Road and the Railway Line, before it is canalized through Claremont and Rondebosch, then uncanalized thought Mowbray, Observatory and Mailtland. Hazendal is famous for is picturesque wine producing valley. A much sought after tourist destination in South Africa. However, on the flipside recently about 33,000gallons of combined waste water out of which around 1,480 gallons were sewage that was released into the Black river from Port Huron Waste Treatment Plant. Residents have raised an alarm as this stinking polluted water runs between their houses causing unbearable stench. This also has given rise to an influx of flies and cockroaches and now has become a health hazard. The residents of the area are demanding the City of Cape Town to take preventive measures and not pump effluent into the river.

 

By: Madhuchanda Saxena

Content: http://ewn.co.za/2018/04/09/hazendal-residents-raise-stink-over-black-river-pollution


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Charity Report Says 4 In 10 Cases of Prostate Cancer Are Diagnosed Late

18 Apr 18

A new report by charity Orchid states that 37% of the prostate cancer patients gets a late of prostate cancer and start the treatment after they have reached stages three and four. In the month of February, more men died from the prostate cancer than women from breast cancer. The charity urges for strict and urgent action to be taken so as to prevent the prostate cancer. Prostate cancer is due to be the most prevalent cancer within the UK in next 12 years. The data was a result of the collection from organisations such as NHS England, charities and the National Prostate Cancer Audit.

Symptoms of Prostate Cancer

  • Difficulty urinating or burning or pain during urination
  • Persistent need to urinate at night
  • Loss of bladder control and needing to run to the toilet
  • Blood in urine
  • Feeling that bladder is not empty even after going to the washroom
  • Less flow of urine

Most of the symptoms are linked to urination and some men can live with prostate cancer for years without any symptoms as the diseases progresses very slowly among patients. During early stages, there are less symptoms. The cancer is diagnosed by prostate specific antigen test, physical examination and biopsies.

Government has already taken steps and made the testing free for men aged above 50 and launched a 75 million pounds of funding for next 5 years of research.

 

By: Neha Maheshwari

Content: http://www.bbc.com/news/health-43669439


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Cotton Exports Expected to Rise Drastically

17 Apr 18

The recent trade war between US and China is expected to bring a lot of financial gain to the Indian cotton industry. As per the statistics of the last 10 days, the Indian mills have exported more than 1.5 lakh bales of cotton to China. These figures have been confirmed by Atul Ganatra, president Cotton Association of India (CAI).

There are speculations that as soon as the trade restrictions between US and China will become effective, China is expected to shift to India totally for its cotton needs. Ganatra states that there have been continuous enquiries regarding the same, ever since the news got public. Since the begging of the Cotton Year 2017-28 on October 1, 2017, India has exported approximately around 6 lakh bales of cotton to China. Indian exporters are hopeful and are all set to meet the increased demands that are soon expected from China.

 

By: Anuja Arora

Content: https://economictimes.indiatimes.com/news/economy/foreign-trade/india-exports-more-than-1-5-lakh-bales-of-cotton-to-china-since-its-tariff-war-with-us/articleshow/63681303.cms

 

 

 

 


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NASA Plans to Send Robotic Bees to Mars

16 Apr 18

NASA wants to send a swarm of robotic, "flapping wing" bees to Mars to help explore the Martian surface. The robots will be as big as bumblebees with cicada sized wings. Called Marsbees, the proposed project, if approved, will work alongside a Mars rover which will also serve as a base for operations and recharging station for the swarm.

According to a release from NASA, a swarm of Marsbees can significantly improve the upcoming Mars missions. They highlighted three major advantages to using Marsbees — setting up sensor networks that can be reconfigured as needed, building Mars resilient systems, and collecting samples and data using the swarm as individuals or as a hive mind. While this concept might seem like a great way to explore the Red Planet, considering how slowly the rovers tend to move, they are yet to be approved for feasibility. The idea has been passed on to a team of researchers for testing. One of these tests will be attempting to fly Marsbees in a vacuum chamber that simulates Martian air density to see how well they can cope in the thin air present on Mars, reports ScienceAlert

By: Swati Kaushal

Content: http://bgr.com/2018/04/05/marsbee-concept-nasa-mars-mission/


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