Sports develop Reflexes in Child

General News | Dec-31-2020

Sports develop Reflexes in Child

Growing up in a family with an affinity for sports increases the likelihood of participating in club-organized sports. Few studies so far have addressed whether the importance of family sport culture is stable or changes during the teenage years. This text examines the association between family sport culture and participation in club-organized sports during teenage years and whether it differs between boys and girls.

We utilize data from Norway and therefore the comprehensive ‘Young in Oslo 2015’ survey (N = 6121; 79% response rate; ages 13–18). Three questions were combined into a measure of family sport culture within the present study: the importance of sport within the family, parents’ training habits, and whether parents would really like their children to participate in sports. We observed a transparent positive relationship between family sport culture and participation in club-organized sports.

Apart from a rather weakened relationship with age among girls, the connection was equally strong altogether age groups. we propose that the general continuity within the relevance of family sport culture for young people’s sport participation reflects a protracted socialization effect that we utilize Bourdieu’s theory of habitus to know.

Our specific interest during this article is whether or not the importance of family sport culture for participation in club-organized sports is stable or changes during the teenage years – a period during which children are assumed to subside hooked into their parents both emotionally and regarding practical issues. By using survey data collected from youth aged 13–18. We tap into an often overlooked issue within the sociology of youth sports, that there could also be age differences in factors linked to sports participation within the broader youth category.

By: Jyoti Nayak
School Name: Birla School, Pilani